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Posts Tagged ‘seasonal’


From inside the parasol of petals


Bird watching

Dear friends,

What I remember best from last weekend were the traffic jams, the three hours on Saturday it took Izzy and I to get to and from the Folger, in order to attend (10 minutes late because we had a helluva time finding parking and finally getting into a tiny spot) the spring Folger concert. I am relieved to be able to say it was worth it once again: an oasis of Elizabeth song and instrumentals: they had a Renaissance Band, Piffaro, using all sorts of older instruments (including bagpipes), a soprano with a achingly beautiful voice (harmony itself, and projected many moods. It’s the lack of commercialism, of hoop-la, no microphones, the quietude that is so appealing. The exhibit was about food and chefs, and it was salutary to see the perspective was one centered on the people who worked hard to produce a variety of yummy foods, and got very little of what they grew, picked, cooked, preserved, wrote about in recipe books.

Izzy was not deterred, for on Sunday she braved the crowded Metro and walked herself and her trusty cell phone to the tidal basin, and above are two of her photos; below two more


From a distance


With people

I stayed home and fretted over my garden; after paying Rosemont too much and monthly payments, they still cannot be bothered to start coming again, so finally I fired them — and within a minute got an email of them thanking me for my business (relieved to be relieved of it), and phoned my faithful Mr Sotha. The next day his crew came, cleaned up the grounds, mowed, mulched. He must’ve been taken aback when after years of coming here, I began to hire someone new: that was only because I couldn’t figure out what plants to buy or where. The Rosemont people took my neighbor’s ridiculously expensive “plan” for me (meaning to put it into execution) and just bought the flowering bushes, and did make a start. Now Mr Sotha will be back to care for my garden bi-monthly once again, with the difference I am asking him to do the gardening too. He didn’t mind. After much effort (two trips, finding a young man who helped us skip a very long line in Home Depot and put the tree in the car for us), Izzy and I brought home a new tree, my gay neighbor had the strength to pull it out of said car and put it near where Mr Sotha had left the mulch, I phoned, and within a couple of hours, this is the result:


New baby tree

Nothing of course as yet to the pink magnolia tree which hangs from my other neighbor’s house into my garden near my workroom


I never knew what it was — I called it a pink tulip tree until someone told me there is no such thing

I was twice to the Folger, for on Thursday I went again, to a special event for members: at 6:30 pm, they screened Ralph Fiennes’ Coriolanus, and then we had a genuinely intelligent discussion of the play and how it was made into a movie, plus how it fits into Shakespeare’s other plays of violent politically ambitious men: it is unusual in not having a figure of integrity (or attempted integrity, say Brutus) or sanity and humor (say Hal against Hotspur) or wit and humanity (Anthony against Octavius) to match the man of blood and insane militarism. I did say one of the courses I’m attending is one on Lear and the Tempest (the AU OLLI).


Both of these for the colors on the waters and in the sky

From you have I been absent in the spring,
When proud-pied April dress’d in all his trim
Hath put a spirit of youth in every thing,
That heavy Saturn laugh’d and leap’d with him.
Yet nor the lays of birds nor the sweet smell
Of different flowers in odour and in hue
Could make me any summer’s story tell,
Or from their proud lap pluck them where they grew;
Nor did I wonder at the lily’s white,
Nor praise the deep vermilion in the rose;
They were but sweet, but figures of delight,
Drawn after you, you pattern of all those.
Yet seem’d it winter still, and, you away,
As with your shadow I with these did play

I use Shakespeare’s deeply felt poetry as a widow’s poem … Another long-term scholarly friend’s husband died during these weeks, and I spent some time with her.

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I have had another of my desolating losses: this time a long-time Internet friend; again I was wholly unprepared for her decision to drop me, so did not pick up on her attempts to pick a quarrel nor read the subtext of her comments on how much she needed tranquillity after her trip (I had thought she wanted me to write to her) and solitude, but finally I did realize she had developed a granular dislike of me — or thinks I’m a kind of fool who wants to hear from her or others they are like me.  Nonsense nor do I want to be like her (she’s a religious person) or have what she has. I can’t and don’t recognize names of prestigious schools (nor care about them in my life as just beyond me) so when I showed I did not remember that she had gone to one as an undergraduate, she was annoyed. Maybe she thought “see I pay no attention  to her.” I am tired or her condescension to me (I’m now endlessly having to apologize when I have said nothing wrong or untrue or have been misunderstood quite quickly, with sudden hard slaps). Of her narrow definitions of various states of mind or conditions that don’t of course touch her. It may be she saw that she had no interest for real in a project towards publication I had proposed — very unlikely we’d get anyone to publish a book of essays by us. So there is nothing to be gained from me. She has no interest in these group readings together or the discussions, especially when no one appears to see her points. It was a bad sign that when she’d come to this part of the US she never tried to visit me, not so much as mentioned this as a possibility.

This kind of loss happens every couple of years for me. Recently I read an essay which suggested this kind of behavior is common, and in a book by Liz Pryor this is the way women typically end friendships! Maybe.  When the woman does write a frank good-bye it is often harsh, and the actuating motive seems often to be the one is tired of the other person or the other person is not optimistic enough for them or just does not realize she is an irritant. Gets the leaver down.

Yet oddly enough I am down to one friend locally (meaning someone to go out with and visit) and yet am not eager to spend time with her as I know we are not really suited. Nor a man I have now dated a few times — others might see the occasions as date-like.  I have yet to keep that promise to myself and live on myself, my books and writing and projects, and distant friends, continual rounds of pleasant acquaintances when the OLLIs are in session. You’d think I’d learn. I did feel rotten, and bleak, dark spirited for a few days, but growing inured by time, remind myself I am freer, no need to spend quality time writing real letters which I now know were unwanted. I talked with another much longer on-line friend (who I have met in person three times now) about this and that helped.  Let it go said he.  Carry on.  As time passes I find maybe I will now know the relief of silence and not being put in the position of misunderstanding while it’s she who is the narrow dogmatist (is that the word).

I ask myself, what would be the crushing blow? I’ve had one: Jim’s death, from which there is no genuine recovery as to have that I’d have had to live my life utterly differently. Another would be if Izzy were decide to move. I must not depend on anyone so will try to find an inexpensive time away for myself in August using Road Scholar.

So back to my Graham book project (which is coming along, as I’ve now hit on a better Dashiell Hammett kind of book by him, though with another creepy title: Fortune is a Woman). Here I watched for the first time with real interest the famous Maltese Falcon, and observed the sardonic humor of Bogart & weird hilarity over death in Peter Lorre, and was astonished at the way no one talks of how repeatedly the weepy sentimentally gushing women in these turn out to be cold-blooded promiscuous liars and how they are humiliated and punished.


Bogart as the sardonic witty Spade


That’s an imagined image of Louisa May Alcott

I’ll alternate my Anomaly project with other books by women, other studies, and just subjects that are taking my interest (Henry VII from Shadow of the Tower, I’ve gotten a superb book, Thomas Penn’s Winter King and watched his equally astute hour-long Prime video twice). I’m working up a blog on American women writers of the 19th century seeking to create serious art, live independently from another fine book Anne Boyd Rioux’s Writing for Immortality.


Penn and the death mask of the actual Henry VII


as performed with quiet brilliance by James Maxwell — here he talks to the young boy Lambert Simnel, relieved to be made a servant in the kitchen; he does not like being king “so very much” after all. “Like me perhaps?” the king inquires.

Mornings I’m joining in more with discussions of the Poldark and Outlander books on face-book pages. This summer I’ll take an excursion into two biographies of Vittoria Colonna and write a serious review and make a good blog of it. Another old friend, Italian, now living on the island of Ischia suddenly wrote to say how this had come about and remarked too: “the Castello Aragonese has undergone some extensive renovations and restorations in the last decade or so. It now hosts cinema viewings during the Ischia Film Festival, has two restaurants each with a spectacular view, a hotel converted from a monastery, two museums one of art work another of medeval torture devices, and new walkways and gardens. Many can be seen here https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=16T6Do7XXsQ&t=130s. Had I world enough and time and could bear the loneliness, I’d stay home re-teach myself to read Italian and read all Ferrante in the original (I am near through her The Story of a New Name). I shall have to look at Road Scholar and see if they have a tour which includes Ischia.

******************************

Perhaps worth remarking: my essay, “Teaching 18th century texts to retired adults in Oscher Institutes of Lifelong Learning” has been published in the latest Intelligencer (an 18th century newsletter periodical for EC/ASECS) and this morning as I prepared the first of two sets of notes/lectures to teach Can You Forgive Her? with, it has struck me I have 29 people in one class and 31 in the other. Most come, most do the reading. Many participate and talk about the book. At least a few do read the essays I occasionally send out by attachment (like Levine’s “‘Can You Forgive Him?’ & the myth of realism,” and Henry’s “Rushing into Eternity:” Finance, Suicide [and murder] in Victorian novels [especially Trollope’s]. I find this remarkable — people between ages 60 and 85 mostly. I doubt they are coming for me. Worth noting on behalf of Trollope?


Clarycat and Ian in my sunroom: I have decided I love this almost furniture-less room, just one comfortable chair for me, two tables and a rocking chair with pretty blankets and pillow for the kitties — otherwise an assortment of what counts and what is needed …

Izzy and I and our cats carry on our home lives together too. I like to watch them so alertly looking out the window. She works on a new song.

Ellen

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“Daffodils/That come before the swallow dares, and take/The winds of March with beauty” … aka spring. Shakespeare, The Winter’s Tale (Act 4), once my favorite of all Shakespeare’s plays: I once taught it.

Dear friends and readers,

I’ve rewritten, re-framed this blog so as to give it an adequate framework: recuperating the self:

Get leave to work/In this world — ’tis the best you get at all — Elizabeth Barrett Browning, Aurora Leigh (1853-56).

This morning I took this photograph of some of the daffodils in my front garden — under the miniature maple tree not yet in bloom …. There are other circles of tiny daffodils on both sides of the house (two circles of flowers and bushes are there), and there are some tiny white crocuses in another part of this circle under the tree, and tiny buds here and there in all the plants that survived and have now popped up green … To me they are living images of hope and each individually has delicate beauty.

I need to see them this way.


The British are not the only group of people being forced to leap into risk

For these past two weeks I would not be telling the truth if I did not say that the externals of life have hit me hard: I have been rightly terrified over the coming plane trip since I am flying Southwest: we now know that added to egregious abuse of passengers to wring the last dime out of them, planes are being rebuilt to hold more people and things and thus becoming unsafe.  Then I was reeling after coming home from the AARP having made out my tax forms and uncovered an unexpected and large tax bill such that I must change my withholding on my monthly annuity and social security checks so as to live on less from here on and pay it bit-by-bit over the year. I am floored by the online boilerplate and relieved my financial adviser has promised really to help me do this when I get back from my trip. The obscenely expensive pills for hepitatis C are working (no sign of the infection in the latest tests) but I’m tired, head-achy (have again scraped my car badly), but each night sleep more deeply than I’ve down for years, except when waked by anxiety-dreams stemming from the coming trip- and conference-ordeal, these renewed money fears.

Ian also has had a hard time recovering, in his case from the new cleaning team, with their loud machines and quick work, now here twice and left a truly clean house (for the first time in years my windows are clean); it won’t do to think about the sums this switch cost me. The business is run by women and only works the first 2/3s of each workday.


After a many hour disappearance, walking about so lightly that his bell did not tinkle: he hoped to escape notice and at first would not eat or drink.

So where to find that peace and trust I can live out what future I’ve left in my quiet ways in this house.

**********************************


L. Scott Caldwell, left, and Shinelle Azoroh in Gem of the Ocean in Costa Mesa.

Well throwing myself into what I am capable of succeeding at doing, and thus enjoying. This past two weeks I have taught/led a class of some 23 retired adults reading (apparently with real enjoyment) Anthony Trollope’s Can You Forgive Her? and myself as a class member felt new interest in rereading the first three acts of King Lear and watching the 2008 Ian McKellen version (director Trevor Nunn, with outstanding performances by the actresses playing Goneril and Regan) and the 2016 Anthony Hopkins (director Richard Eyre, with outstanding performances by too many to mention). Despite the cutting, the Hopkins-Eyre one is the vastly superior by original direction and Hopkins’s performance). I’m stunned by Wilson’s Gem of the Ocean and Joe Turner Come & Gone, only beginning to realize the lack of fundamental safety, security, ability to accumulate, and radically de-stablized relationships and lives this causes — a journey through the century from an African-American perspective. With my two list communities, I’m reading EBB’s Aurora Leigh, which I know I ought to be more affected than I am, and Margaret Kennedy’s Together and Apart, which, by contrast, I’m having a visceral personal response to the point I find myself blaming the heroine for not caring enough about her children, for in effect abandoning them, while on what seems a sort of whim at first, she pursues a divorce.

Wednesday I leave for Denver, Colorado, to endure a three-day conference on the 18th century (ASECS) and have my paper, “After the Jump:” Winston Graham’s use of documented facts and silences,” down to 19 minutes. Winston Graham has taken up much of my time therefore, with intervals filled by absorption (when I can) with Elena Ferrante’s The Story of a New Name, Margaret Kennedy’s Together and Apart. I’ve added Somerset Maugham as an author who would shed light on Graham’s peculiar story of a blind man in internecine post-WW2 southern France (the hero stalks a heroine of the resistance), Night Without Stars, and am into Jeremy Poldark, a deeply melancholy troubled yet loving book once again. I now see that the murdered young woman in his Take My Life (I understand the title as a cry of the soul) and this heroine as seeking safety, the first women was destroyed by cruelty, meanness, the tunneled ambition of a schoolmaster; the second rescued as a fellow disabled person to return to quietude in a quiet corner of England. I came to this by watching a modern so-called “thriller:” In a Better World: To call it a thriller is so wrong, it’s hilarious: The film brings out the trauma underlying some thrillers which the thriller distorts in order to sell widely, and there are authors who appear not quite to understand the fundamental groundwork of such texts. I must write this up separately.

I’ve gone on to the intelligent Rebecca Traister’s All the Single Ladies (which begins in the 19th century and takes the story to the 21st) and Ann Rioux’s Writing for Immortality, on four American women writers whose determination to write well for the sake of their art will be explicated as a fight for self-esteem and creating works of integrity, so am now eager to include at least one 19th century American women writer amid my Anomaly women. When I read Traister, I realize I am somewhat compensating for the loss of Jim: in small ways I am learning to live the way she has, learning about a world outside my coupled life. It is as yet on the edges of my existence because I have not managed to hold onto friends or a group of friends locally. Throughout my life with Jim, though, if the truth be told I would have one girlfriend usually, a kind of best friend, and so this pattern is one I know, only now I see this in a different context. I know I am right to value my FB women friends (and men too). I understand Laura’s life choices better too.

********************************

My solitude, my self … at night (when I write these blogs too, gentle reader)


Shadow of the Tower: Episode 4: The Serpent and the Comforter

I’m riveted nightly by yet another episode of the truly astonishing 1970 BBC multi-episode studio drama, The Shadow of the Tower, with James Maxwell — why is not this more famous? A blog will follow when I’ve gone through all 13 hours twice. I started it after it was recommended by an uneven Future Learn on the Tudors I’m following just now.

Episode 4 is a study of people about to burn alive a man who has a set of radical common sense beliefs — one guard becomes unwilling and realizes this is all wrong and so does the king but goes through with it — so it’s idealized but this allows for conversations between the man and guard and king. We don’t see the torture off stage as they attempt to make him recant — just hear it and it’s agonizing to hear and then see all the signs on the man’s body. The real thrust is to shove in our faces at length the deep inhumanity of man to man and also the fierce unreasoning religiosity of the era as a cover up for power plays and fierce demands for obedience to strict conformity. James Maxwell is brilliant as the king throughout the series: witty, somehow likable, warmly human in his closest relationships, subtly intelligent yet peevish, neurotic, but effective, slowly becoming a terrifying inexorable monster to others because he has been given such power

I am also nightly now making my way through all Andrew Davies’s films, beginning with deeply mourning from within as I sit up and feel with Claire Foy’s inch-by-inch agon as she copes with her half-mad neurotic father played by Tim Courtney. Half hour by hour I am her — as I am Lila and Lenu.

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On the Net, I’ve been stirred by the life and work of another woman artist, one I won’t write a blog for (as I would be wholly inadequate) but can here invite my readers to dwell in the Spitalfields bloggers’ essays: on Dorothy Rendell:


Dorothy Rendell, View from Standhead (1955)

http://spitalfieldslife.com/…/an-exhibition-of-dorothy-ren…/

Then Stephen Watts, described as a poet and novelist, wrote about her art, the legacy of what’s left:

http://spitalfieldslife.com/…/the-legacy-of-dorothy-rendell/


Rendell, Studio Parrot (1960)

Now the gentle author preparing for a lecture, shares with us the Rendell’s drawings and illustrations:

http://spitalfieldslife.com/…/03/12/dorothy-rendells-london/

Her first (posthumous) solo exhibit:

http://spitalfieldslife.com/…/16/dorothy-rendells-solo-show/

The gentle author is pseudonymous; I originally assumed the writer is a woman, but recently I’ve become aware the writer is a man — he has begun to use a pronoun for himself. Also that more than one person writes this blog (Gillian Tindall has written here) — it’s astonishing high quality, frequency and point of view are all outstanding, but also the amount of knowledge displayed. Probably it’s find-out-able if I tried or asked someone who knows people who are part of real art worlds in London.

One we learned in another blog that a pub that has been on the site since the 17th century, with one period of total obsolescene and desuetude (between 1970s and 2000) is now to be razed and replaced with a hideous mall that will look like a thousand others

http://spitalfieldslife.com/20…/…/13/so-long-the-water-poet/

This touches me because in one of my periods of being alive I spent all my time reading and writing about the early modern Renaissance and 17th century. Anne Finch was a later 17th century poet who lived into the 18th century. This blog is or should be of interest to anyone interested in the long 18th century.

Most recently, at and on the Whitechapel Bell Foundry:

http://spitalfieldslife.com/2019/03/17/dorothy-rendell-at-whitechapel-bell-foundry/


Camille Cottage, Castle Hedingham with red chair (1970)

W.S. Merwin has died, and an FB friend pointed me and others to a New York Review of Books essay-review by Ange Mlinko on Merwin’s life and poetry as that of an whole earth troubadour, who learned his art by the humble practice of learning other languages and translating wonderful poetry in them. I liked this (though I taught myself Italian enough to read and to translate it, and now need to return to it and to French

There is nothing for you to say. You must
Learn first to listen. Because it is dead
It will not come to you of itself, nor would you
Of yourself master it. You must therefore
Learn to be still when it is imparted,
And, though you may not yet understand, to remember.

What you remember is saved. To understand
The least thing fully you would have to perceive
The whole grammar in all its accidence
And all its system, in the perfect singleness
Of intention it has because it is dead.
You can only learn one part at a time.

The ghost of a sestina (invented, they say, by the troubadour Arnaut Daniel) haunts these six-line stanzas, with their repetitions of individual words (though they don’t repeat mechanically at the ends of the lines, as they do in the sestina). What is repeated? Learn, dead, remember, understand. As the poem goes on, it repeats saved, intention, order, passion. Here is the fifth and final stanza:

What you remember saves you. To remember
Is not to rehearse, but to hear what never
Has fallen silent. So your learning is,
From the dead, order, and what sense of yourself
Is memorable, what passion may be heard
When there is nothing for you to say.


Merwin in his last year of life

The question is, how to recuperate the self. Mlinko believes translation is the suppression of self and that in poetry at its finest we suppress the self, we make something from nothing tangible or new as I have done tonight: Guilhem IX’s “Farai un vers de dreit nien” (“Sheer nothing’s what I’m singing of”)

This reminds me of Virginia Woolf: she wanted Anne Finch to transcend herself. This is mistaken, or need to be put another way. We can never leave ourselves, but what we can do is throw off the attacks and pressures from all around us (the wolves of society) and recuperate by following our true bends with integrity. That is the work of a lifetime. Finding who we are, and as Pope said, following nature, our nature. Making what we can. Recuperating by flowering out. I can link August Wilson’s plays to Shakespeare’s this way too: although we do not know what was his private life, only that he is incarnate in his plays.


Dorothy Rendell, Jerena at Harry Gosling School (1960): recuperating the self — look how beautifully Rendell has caught the child’s hands, the textures of her jacket and skirt, her body inside them ….

I have taken to going to Evolution Home, a consignment shop for furniture where older things are rescued. I am making my home comfortable by buying appropriate (for my needs) tables, retro clocks, rugs, baskets for my library of DVDS (kindly sent by a friend so that I have such a collection of splendid wonderful movies, often BBC). Rearranging furniture, making corners for pretty things and where I do my work. All recuperating the self, having respect and concern for myself and what I see. I hope you don’t need photos of these, for there’s not much to see. It’s the inward experience behind such changes I’m trying to steady myself with.

Ellen

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She bought a new keyboard about three weeks ago now, and I hope you can hear the difference:

The song comes from a movie called Once, made a couple of musicians who made a movie about how they met and fell in love. John Carney, the film’s director built the movie around this song provided for him by Glen Hansard and Marketa Irglova. The song won an Oscar the year of the movie. They made a second album about dealing with fame. The third is about how they broke up.

Here are the words of the lyrics for “Falling Slowly:”

I don’t know you
but I want you
All the more for that
Words fall through me and always fool me
And I can’t react
And games that never amount
To more than they’re meant
Will play themselves out

Take this sinking boat and point it home
We’ve still got time
Raise your hopeful voice, you have a choice
You’ll make it now

Falling slowly, eyes that know me
And I can’t go back
Moods that take me and erase me
And I’m painted black
You have suffered enough
And warred with yourself
It’s time that you won

Take this sinking boat and point it home
We’ve still got time
Raise your hopeful voice, you have a choice
You’ll make it now

Take this sinking boat and point it home
We’ve still got time
Raise your hopeful voice, you have a choice
You’ll make it now

Falling slowly sing your melody
I’ll sing along

***************************

This morning I was thinking about earlier stretches of my life. The phrase “long ago” is so common to my imagined conversation in my mind. So long ago Jim and I did this, Izzy would do that. I saw a child walk by from my window, on his back a carry-pack, shouldering a musical instrument. That once was Izzy going to junior high, to high school.

Last night (not atypical day and evening), alerted to it by a book on British TV costume drama I’d been reading, Conflicting Masculinities (one I sent a proposal for on Wolf Hall but was rejected, because I’m not a Brit, have no title or position in a university and my thesis was too much about deeper humanity and attributing the way men are presented in costume drama to an era), I watched Banished, a serial drama which was cancelled but is powerfully about one group of men destroying the manliness and humanity of another group, treating them like enslaved beasts; also showing how one group of people can be so cruel to another when no wider public eyes are upon them. Banished is a parable about how people in our modern societies are now pulverizing the poorer, vulnerable, ethnicities that are not in the majority among them, and refugees from countries these same groups of people are busy destroying so they can steal their natural resources. Unlike Poldark there is no fundamental place, home, knowledge of one another and known community whose interest it is to support one another they can turn to.

Yesterday during the day I read one third of an immensely sad novel, Crossing the River, nominated for the Booker (when it still didn’t accept imitative crap, hadn’t become a sheer advertisement mechanism), by Caryl Phillips. Crossing the River a related book about a white man sending a beloved black man who was enslaved in the US to Liberia (both die of grief as the people they are surrounded by live these punitive lives) made me realize what a fantasy of escape Outlander becomes in this story of Jamie and Claire and Ian making a secure home so readily (he is a wanted ex-convict). I also thought of how I cling to this house as giving me some meaning and safety, not naked in the world among all these indifferent people. Phillips’s message is do anything but separate yourself from a beloved and send them somewhere where life is said to be better — all you are doing is breaking your two hearts. I’m drawn to Phillips: born in St Kitts, yet British, he grew up in Leeds, a place I did love.

Both together — serial drama and book — made me think of how I cling to this house as giving me some meaning and safety, not naked in the world among all these indifferent people, and a book about the Acadia diaspora when threatened by “ethic cleansing,”

“Falling slowly” is a song that cries out for help (as some tweets really do). In retrospect, its framing is a young couple who broke up.

It is March now, signs of spring — such a sweet moment from Emily Dickinson: No 1320, just the first stanza:

Dear March – Come in –
How glad I am –
I hoped for you before –
Put down your Hat –
You must have walked –
How out of Breath you are –
Dear March, how are you, and the Rest –
Did you leave Nature well –
Oh March, Come right upstairs with me –
I have so much to tell —

How I wish I could find a choir for Izzy to belong to. The only ones in my area are part of churches Izzy won’t go near — and she’s probably right not to, reactionary Catholicism she would be a very much outsider in all ways in. With that man I went out briefly with I saw an episcopal church, almost non-denominational, eucumenical, which had a poster looking for people to join their choir. A modern building, maybe enlightened people running the place. But it’s a 45 minute drive and would be at night so I can’t provide a way for her to get there, if I could get her to go. She did say yes when I showed her the place. Too far. But this is her home too.


Writing Last lines ….

Miss Drake

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Richard Hunt’s Swing Low — a bronze sculpture in the front hall of the African-American Museum, alluding to the song, which carries on “sweet chariot, comin’ for to carry me home … ”

I love this song, and sing it to myself sometimes thinking of Jim, changing it slightly: “if you get there before I do/Coming for to carry me home/tell yourself I’m coming too; bands of angels coming after …


Cosette finds Jean Valjean working as a peasant again, his death by her side — Andrew Davies’s Les Miserables, 2018, one of the finest film adaptations I’ve seen since his War and Peace and before that Peter Straughn’s Wolf Hall — the scenes of the revolt at the barricades are astonishingly grim, true, ferocious; he shows Hugo’s book centers on “the wretched of this earth” —

I thought of Hamlet; who would keep him in this harsh world to draw his breathe in pain …

Friends,

Another 10 days of winter passed, & few things maybe worth recording happened — living from the shelter of my mind.

A friend’s cat died, Andre by name, he was a rescue cat, now 20, and her grief and my memories aroused in me thoughts of what matters in life: the strength to be kind, to give of oneself and see the other and love and be loved; our non-human (non-talking, without hands) animal friends are so helpless against our convenience. I’ll ever regret I didn’t do by my actually beloved Llyr as I should have: my excuse Jim and my dire desperation at the time, but this will not do. She was able to bury her cat companion in her back yard so she can see his grave from her window and remember what was good. I realize why people when they lose beloved people want the bodies back, if only to protect them. I read to Laura when little Judith Viorst’s The Tenth Good Thing about Barney, where he lays under the flowers at book’s end; my favorite passage was the dream image of him in heaven with the other cats eating cans of tuna.


Clarycat this week; and Ian pussycat too

Email letters from a few friends, a long phone call from Panorea, whom I am relieved to say is doing well after the operation on her spine and we may yet go to Philadelphia Museums together this August as we dreamed of in December; Farideh found an old blog of mine, Sylvia I, 2002, which shows that after all I’ve not changed much.

On the blog I found this poem “from Desk,”by Marina Tsvetaeva, as translated by Elaine Feinstein:

(In a letter she wrote to Pasternak :my desk is kitchen table)

My desk , most loyal friend
thank you. You’ve been with me on
every road I’ve taken.
My scar and my protection.

My loaded writing mule.
Your tough legs have endured
the weight of all my dreams, and
burdens of piled-up thoughts.

Thank you for toughening me.
no worldly joy could pass
your severe looking-glass
you blocked the first temptation,

and every base desire
your heavy oak outweighed
lions of hate, elephants
of spite you intercepted.

Thank you for growing with me
as my need grew in size
I’ve been laid out across you
so many years alive

While you’ve grown broad and wide
and overcome me. Yes,
however my mouth opens
You stretch out limitless.

You are a pillar
of light. My source of Power!
You lead me as the Hebrews once
were led forward by fire.

******************************

One of my holds on happiness this week was about 45 minutes of a class at OLLI at Mason where our subject was the texts of TS Eliot, read aloud by members of the group, by himself very ritualistically in a video from PBS (Visions), “The Hollow Men:” it’s a kind of modernization of Dante’s Inferno: favorite lines:

In this last of meeting places
We grope together
And avoid speech
Gathered on this beach of the tumid river

Sightless, unless
The eyes reappear
As the perpetual star
Multifoliate rose
Of death’s twilight kingdom
….

I had forgotten a line I often recited to my daughters upon leaving the house comes from “The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock (“Oh do not ask what is it?/Let us go and make our visit … “) but my favorite remains: The Coming of the Magi:

That the high school teacher who was leading the class read accurate interpretations from slides, set forth like test answers (desperation, the aftermath of WW2), which she appeared to treat with a kind of philistine mainstream scepticism, drove made me pay attention to the poetry which did speak for itself.  How beautiful and haunting are his lines, the rhythms of them stay in the mind, on the pulses. Other people in the class made intelligent sympathetic observations too.

For the OLLI at AU, I read (skimmed) with a class who met 5 times (I came four) the whole of Tennyson’s Idylls of the King. I have little explanation for why this un-reconstructed misogynistic violent, atavistic romance material so attracts me, but it did again. I found myself making parallels with so much romance I see today (Outlander has the paradigms), remembering back to other Arthurian books and films I’ve read or experienced. Again a fellow class member seemed to have more true depths in his reading than the person serving as teacher, and allegorized the as “Civilization and Its Discontents:” we are watching so-called civilized (at least controlled ritualized) behavior fall apart into chaos as human nature moves into sheer self-destruction, perversions of natural feeling, or cruelty, obtuseness, ending in wild despair. Consider this engraving of “The Passing of Arthur by Frank Dicksee (1889):

Read with insight and truth to our real emotions, Tennyson can be said to anticipate T.S. Eliot (much influenced by him).

At OLLI at Mason, more brilliant moving sessions on Joyce’s Dubliners from Prof Michael Maloof, whose modernism puts stories of ordinary people into Eliot’s frame; a films about Vivian Maier, more poetry, Elizabeth Bishop.

Only connect ….

*******************************

Today the last day, 75 minutes at OLLI at Mason on the African-American Museum, which I know must go to. The docent described what is there, just remarkable, sobering, true, with the a better if neither fair nor good time in general in history, with a few genuine gains since Africans were no longer enslaved; the museum showcases culture too –so modern art, music, film, sport, and African-American 20th century culture. It took from 1915 when it was first audaciously proposed to 2015 to achieve this astonishing place; congress people were most of the time willing to approve, but not fund or do anything constructive: two of the movers were John Lewis and Oprah Winfrey. What a day that must have been on opening with the President himself and his wife, African-American. Not enough such good moments. I am half-planning to go all day Tuesday: it’s a trek, bus, train then walk. But February you can just walk in without pre-buying a timed ticket.

At home, I got back to my projects, the book on Winston Graham and the anomaly: I”m reading a very good historical fiction set in the 19th century by Graham, Cordelia (to be written about separately); and a moving account of Liberty: “A better husband,” single women in the US from 1780-1830 by Chambers-Schiller: inspiring she is, telling of the vocational life of women in the era, their valuing themselves gradually, their lives count, their gifts found fulfillment in reading, writing and also finding places in society where their desire to do good work was not just tolerated but allowed to do actual good, as in Emily Howland.

I watched Davies’s Les Miserables, all six parts, and will watch again in March — from DVDs made from the BBC airing while the PBS versions play on Sunday nights, how they rise up and are murdered for their efforts (as in Chile in the 1970s, as Trump and his vile mignons are readying to do in Venezuela, and he’s doing now on the borders of the US. I proposed to Trollope&Peers that in two summers we try Hugo’s Notre-Dame de Paris: I read it in French in my twenties and think we as a group have learned how to do long books that take effort and patience together. I’m half tempted to propose Les Miserables, but our list had a hard time with it years ago and gave it up; I know David Bellos’s book, Les Miserables: The Novel of the Century (he wrote an exciting book, truly, on translation I reviewed — Is that a fish in your ear?).  Bellos’s one of these autobiographical meditative reads of wonderful novels might get us through — after or together with Davies.

And I continue with Outlander nightly, solacing myself among its ghosts of devoted fierce love, deep congeniality, Jamie & Claire; they’d give up all in a split second to be together again and they do, repeatedly. And I exercise, listen to folk and country music, traditional (Pete Seeger) and contemporary (Nanci Griffiths) from Pandora; the header line comes from a folk song.

********************************

Personally significant — now I may not die from liver disease or a fatal operation in 15 years:

I was successful in wrenching needed treatment from Kaiser; finally a clinical pharmacist called this Friday and I have begun my pills as of Monday, and my schedule of blood work, restricted diet for now. I discovered Kaiser was indeed stalling and trying to put me off: the pill have a ticket price (wait for it) of $36,000 for three bottles, enough pills in each for three months. My widow’s annuity and social security come to $47,000 for the whole year. Now embedded as I am in “protections,” I can afford these bottles this way: I pay $150 a bottle to Kaiser; now in reality US society is being gouged by the drug companies (read Marcia Angell, “Opioid Nation,” from the NYRB) for these pills through Kaiser, medicare and a web of “financial assistance” it’s called. When I told friends the sum, there was hardly a gasp; instead of got stories of their analogous experiences. Everyone keeps silent, especially when they have not been able to buy or afford the needed medical treatments (opioid victims, people with diabetes, cancer&c): they grow much sicker and die early. I am feeling tired, head-achy and (surprising this!) sleep 6 hours each night, sometimes a light doze but that long …

*********************************

And I went out again (probably the last time, as we are fundamentally incompatible in attitudes towards life) with that gentle older man, a concert at his church by a “famous” (a word he kept repeating) group of singers from Yale, called the Whiffenpoofs. I have very mixed feelings about this elite group of 20 year olds.

They were presented to a mostly white, upper to middle middle class audience, many older as somehow not elite and “working hard” earning all their keep. The group was formed in 1909 and following tradition, the young adults take a year off from their Yale studies and are supported wholly by ticket sales. Wait a minute: who is paying the Yale fees? how much are they? The humor and much be-praised group spirit are sophomoric and this time all but one a woman, she has to sing counter-tenor (a falsetto). This was the first year women were let in — Yale did not accept women at all until 1969. They were all in very fancy tuxedos — they did sing beautifully in some style where their distinctly different voices came out as crooning. Nostalgic repertoire with some contemporary music and songs re-vamped interestingly thrown in.

Well, for the first time I had some insight into blackface. Until recently it would appear the all-male chorus would dress up in ballet skirts, absurd wigs, wear make-up as women and have their photo taken, and spend an afternoon “doing lunch.” What is this but unacknowledged cruel ridicule: the group pretends innocence but utter disdain for women (as in blackface lynching for blacks), and as we saw in Kavanaugh, central fraternities’s right to harassment and rape women is part of their obduracy. Scroll down, and see the meaning of blackface.

This new young woman as reported in the Washington Post, is ever so grateful for being let in to these Whiffenpoofs, to Yale, though recognizes “they have a long way to go,” for example, they must change the voices allowed in to include women’s ranges. Sofia Campoamor cannot be as “ordinary” as pretended since she attended the elite Sidwell Friends school in DC. Julie Zauzmor of the Post article, to her credit kept in focus the elitism, asked questions of the religious aspects of this Ivy League college, this 1920s “fun” group.

*****************************

Political coda: AOC is now in congress and making beautiful waves for a “green New Deal:” I like her smile, don’t you?

So that’s the news from my desk and the shelter of my mind (a line from Paul Simon’s “Kathy’s Song”) in Alexandria, Va,

Ellen

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The Great Falls of the Potomac, in Rockcreek Parkway, Montgomery, Maryland this morning


This is probably the best close photo taken of me in years

Dear friends,

I begin by telling you why I haven’t written for nearly two weeks again: it is hard for me to write just now since while I have had some enjoyable experiences to share (see below) or perhaps coming up (if I survive), I am still profoundly worried about this hepitatis C infection. One way with which I deal with life’s experiences is there comes up from my mind unbidden lines from texts that present an analogous situation, appropriate feelings, some indication of a good line of conduct I am able to follow with calm. Most often it’s a Jane Austen line, often half-remembered but enough so I can pinpoint which of the six novels and then remember where it was.

When I go to bed and think about what happened over a day wherein I disappointed myself, I say “I’ll do better tomorrow” or “I’ll try to do better tomorrow,” or even worse (from the viewpoint of originality): “Tomorrow is another day.” Another one where I realize I cannot do much or nothing at all to alter a particular future: “Che sera, sera” (what will be, will be). Upon coming home from a trip “determined, dared, done:” “Home again home again jiggedy-jig.” Upon going out of my house-nest, “Oh do not ask what is it. Let us go and make our visit …

Well I found myself remembering a conversation I couldn’t quite reach in my mind. It has to do with someone pressuring someone else to follow a line of conduct or decision that someone does not want to take and he or she replies to the first person she’s trying hard not to remember X at all (that is what Elinor Dashwood tries after she discovers that Edward Ferrars has been engaged to another women for four years. I felt it was a play, probably a woman or someone who could identify with vulnerable people who can speak with pride, dignity, self-containment. Finally the word “endeavour” came to me as I tried to formuate the line: “endeavour” is not a common word in many individual vocabularies, and google now took me straight to the correct text: it’s from Bolt’s A Man for all Seasons: Henry (Robert Shaw) asking More (Paul Scofield) if he has thought more about his divorcing Catherine and More replies: “Alas, as I think of it, I see so clearly that I cannot come with Your Grace, that my endeavour is not to think of it at all.” I taught and read Bolt’s play many times, watched the scene with Paul Scofield and Robert Shaw countless times with students too.

I am convinced it was Kaiser two or three summers ago when I was sick and had to have an IV when I came to a clinic or when I paid a dentist to put four implants and a semi-permanent denture into my jaw. For the first time too I’ve had an open run-around from Kaiser, where they seem to be stalling before they give me the medicine. I had the x-rays and my liver is as healthy as a 72 year old woman’s liver can be, apparently as yet unharmed. This doctor talked about my liver as people talk about my hearing: “it’s within the range of ordinary and average for a person your age;” on a scale of 1-4 I am in the “1s” – whatever that means. But when I showed up to talk to this specialist I discovered that having an infection of hepitatis C immediately makes the person a suspect — it’s transmitted through drug IVs — not just hospitals use but people take illegal drugs this way. Also that it’s transmitted by sex — this is said in the literature I’ve now read to be rare. I had to submit to half an hour of apparently genial questions and probably now have to have another scan because I did describe my 5 blood transfusions, so she’s giving a more expensive test. She asked if Jim had hepitatis C, she managed if he had other partners. I said I didnt think so to both questions, no symptoms.

She decided (and wrote down on her computer) that I’d gotten it from among these 5 hemorrhages, transfusion and the bad miscarriage I had between 1976 and 1984 (four pregnancies, one small rupture in my colin). This is preposterous. Were I to have had this infection for forty years and drunk the way I have I’d have no liver. I’ve had health assessments after 1984 (when Izzy was born) and no one came up with this diagnosis; Jim had health assessments in the 1990s when he had diverticulitis and no diagnosis for hepitatis C. Obviously I picked it up in the last couple years iatropically — from Kaiser. And she knows it. She is another liar — I’ve seen these liars before in Kaiser; before we went to Kaiser I had no criteria at all even to judge what I was told. Their first interest is their place in the organization. My health comes down low in their priorities.

I was astonished when she then asked me if I wanted to take this medicine, and she asked 3 times. They are powerful over us and I worried were I to get frank I’d be seen as aggressive and not get this medicine. Now I have to wait and get a phone call from a “clinical pharmacist” and she said she had no doubt he would recommend the medicine. But wait, that means he could not – he’s a Cyberus. I almost asked her “Are you doubting my veracity” but I held back. (I dislike so how these medical people have power over us.) Then he phones her, then she phones me, and then the medicine is sent to a pharmacy where I pick it up. Rigarmole or run-around. I’ve had no phone call. The GI specialist nurse has not returned my calls. I today emailed Dr Wiltz, my general practioner and this woman, Dr Chowla. By Friday I shall lodge a complaint they are not willing to take are of me. The price, dear reader, of this medicine is very high in the US. Kaiser would rather see me die

I remember reading how some necessary testing procedure to prevent cancer of the uterus or find it out early was being stopped because it supposedly would encourage girls to have sex – they need not be afraid. And an attempt to re-extend abortion rights has everyone up in arms as infanticide. There is it women want to commit infanticide. No talk about women’s health, whether the child has become severely disabled in the womb..

What the woman doctor is doing is dismissing what caused it — Kaiser — and putting all this stuff in the file about my bleeding history and answers to questions that put suspicion on me or Jim. This business of person phoning me as a way to take care of me is what happened to Jim when he was dying: he was taking a blood thinner and then one day his blood was so thin he was in danger of hemorrhaging from his skin — he was following orders from someone on a phone said to be watching his numbers. That’s how much this man on the phone was paying attention. Then Kaiser tried to bully me into going into the Emergency room at 10 o’clock at night or if it was my fault Jim would die. I said it was not my fault and the last place I was taking him to at 10 at night was a local emergency. You should have seen the weak state Jim was in. They called an ambulance anyway; these guys arrive and when I refuse to let them have Jim, they say “this happens all the time.” I’ll never forget that moment. Kaiser and others play this trick all the time. They said they would never advise anyone to take someone to one of these madhouse emergency rooms at the dea of night who was deeply sick and weak.

Finally a Kaiser nurse came and she had blood supplies and injections. She expected me to be grateful. She was overtime. She said the problem was different people paid for the drugs than the hospital, and each had to sign off on the other as no one knew what the other was doing for sure.

The next day that pharmacist called again and I got on the phone to tell he was a murderous criminal taking a salary for what he couldn’t therefore should not pretend to do, he should be ashamed of himself, for his unprofessional unethical behavior, and never call again. I said I knew they were taping me: well, they were bastards and I’d sue the lot of them. I hung up. We stopped all blood tests and the rest of their shit using this pharmacist. Jim had been calling and cooperating. I had not known about this so clearly. This is the result of privatizing: kaiser is refusing to hire a full time clinical pharmacist. And now I have to accept such phone calls or I don’t get my medicine. I vowed I never accept such phone calls.

Does anyone wonder why the US is 32nd in health care across the world.

I did stop drinking, though my respect for wine has gone up when I looked at supermarket shelves to discover the vile chemically flavored sugared water with addition of juices that are sold — and bought! — by large numbers of people instead of 100% tomato juice, or pear nectar, or pineapple. I had to go to the gourmet section of the supermarket to find decent healthy drinks.

If I can’t get them to take care of me, I’ll ask a few friends for names of doctors and go privately and pay a lot. Shameful disgraceful society so self-deluded and helpless against a ruthless oligarchy using a ferocious military and a 18th century constitution re-rigged by bad faith criminal behavior so a tiny minority of super-rich together with deluded fools and white bigots run the place ….

I have no picture: this is not the first time I’ve been unable to find any picture depicting the poor care the average patient gets from the medical establishment: most of the pictures blame the patient somehow (he or she takes too many drugs) or the insurance or drug companies, not the linchpin person, the doctor. Jim never wanted to leave Kaiser and advised me not to: most of the “care” he and I had outside Kaiser in the US was poor, and over-price outrageously.  The National Health in Britain I found took care of me and saved me once but very autocratic.

The trouble is, how do you find someone else to go to? The reason Jim and I rejoiced at Kaiser was for the first time in our lives we had an array of doctors to go to.  I can think to ask Panorea if she knows  a good doctor of this new friend David. To this day I have no idea how people find doctors. They talk of research, but that seems to be nowadays talking to people (how do they know?) and reading on the Net: these are advertisements.  It was the ridiculous word of mouth that I used before Kaiser and sometimes I got a decent reasonable man but more often the experience was bad — I was fleeced, laughed at, minimally taken care of. That’s the real key to why Jim and I and now Izzy joined an HMO. This is no way at all.

*****************************


Laura Linney as Caroline in The City of Your Final Destinationwhich is your Moscow?

Better news is my course for the summer at OLLI at AU has been accepted. Here’s the proposal:

The Mann Booker Prize: short and short-listed

We’ll cover 2 (short) short-listed, 1 (short) winner, & watch 1 movie (outside class) from a screenplay by a Booker winner from an American novel it’s said should have won the prize had it been given to Americans at the time. Our novels: Penelope Fitzgerald, The Bookshop; J. L. Carr, A Month in the Country; Julian Barnes’s A Sense of an Ending, and a Merchant-Ivory film, screenplay Ruth Prawer Jhabvala, The City of your Final Destination (from Peter Cameron’s novel). We’ll discuss our prize-obsessed culture, how the Bookers function in the literary marketplace, & their typical themes, techniques & moods: autobiographical, historical, self-reflexive, witty, post-colonial, mostly melancholy books & films

The last time I wrote it was January 26th, and winter term for the OLLI at Mason had started but all had been shut down because it snowed — and this DC, Maryland, Virginia area goes paralyzed, announces a standstill when it snows, as the local gov’ts will not pay to clear the snow and ice adequately. They get away with this because when the sun comes out, the snow melts. This week we have warmed up and the OLLI at AU has its week of 4-5 day a week courses. It lasts for one week; the rest of January and February includes lectures, special events (one all-day reading of some of Joyce’s Ulysses once again).

I’ve enjoyed two excellent classes in Joyce’s Dubliners, given a professor who seven years ago had Izzy in his class on Irish Literature. When I told her the teacher was this man, her eyes lit up: she gave a paper or presentation on Elizabeth Bowen’s Last September, and he liked it and saw how gifted she is, and after that went out of his way to include her in the class. She was very sad that year, not being able to get any job despite her wonderful degree, so dressed oddly and the classes she went to at night meant a lot to her. She read Anne Enright in that classes; also Joyce’s “The Dead” from the Dubliners. She and I watched a fine film adaptation of Last September with Michael Gambon and Fiona Shaw in feature roles. Now this week I have four sessions on Tennyson’s Idylls of the King: the teacher is too simplistic in the way she presents the material but the class is leading her to talk more deeply of what she knows; it’s late in the day so I can work on my projects, read (see below) — after I finish phoning and emailing Kaiser.


A beautiful early cover for Graham’s Demelza (1940s) — a dream place through a window (the first cover for Ross Poldark is based on a similar conceit)

I am still reading Elena Ferrante’s My Brilliant Friend: how it hits home, how I recognize myself in both Lenu and Lila and something like the working and lower class world I grew up in.  We are still reading Trollope’s strong The Way We Live Now on Trollope&Peers, I listen to Simon Vance reading aloud Can You Forgive Her? and nightly I watch and re-watch Outlander. It is addictive:  at the center is a couple I find a dream image of Jim and I; they are essential a tragic pair that faery romance keeps saving. I work on my Poldark paper for the Denver ASECS; it’s coming slowly and has a title now: “‘After the Jump’: The Historical Fiction of Winston Graham.”


Me standing in front of one of the waterfalls

I will end on another pleasant experience with the man, a widower, I mentioned I went on a date with in mid-January; the second time he seems to be a gentle kind old man, sweet; whatever he was when younger, he is kindly now.  Second impressions are better than first; more knowledge comes in.

I saw his house where he has himself made some of the furniture including beautiful wooden rocking horse for a child. He showed me his late wife’s picture; it is much bigger fine home — with a large room given over to his computer and books, and another for a TV on the wall (so you watch the screen like a movie). He has a garden and two cats. One large lovely long-haired one (many colored)  is friendly. We had breakfast and then there was just time to go to Great Falls of Potomac where I’d never been (indeed I never heard of it before he told me of it. You see it above and a photo he took of me. Here are two more:


A friendly young person took this photo of David (that’s his name) and me together

The park all around this waterfall and ancient rock area was created by Frederick Law Olmsted. So I’ve now walked in four of Olmsted’s Parks: Central Park and Brooklyn Park in NYC, Montreal park, and now this part of Rockcreek parkway. From the site: David told me he took an OLLI at AU course about the geology and history of the formation of Washington, DC a few years ago:

Many people consider the Great Falls of the Potomac to be the most spectacular natural landmark in the Washington D.C. area. Here, the Potomac River builds up speed and force as it falls over a series of steep, jagged rocks and flows through the narrow Mather Gorge.

This dramatic scene makes Great Falls Park, located just fifteen miles from the Nation’s Capital, a popular site with local residents and tourists from around the world who are visiting the Washington area.

The falls consist of cascading rapids and several 20 foot waterfalls, with a total 76 foot drop in elevation over a distance of less than a mile.

The Potomac River narrows from nearly 1000 feet, just above the falls, to between 60 and 100 feet wide as it rushes through Mather Gorge, a short distance below the falls. The Great Falls of the Potomac display the steepest and most spectacular fall line rapids of any eastern river.

Maybe I shall go with him canoeing — if he can manage with a person like me who is so unathletic and nervous. I keep using the word “nervous” of myself as an explanation of this or that but I don’t think he hears me. He bike-rides twice a week.  omg!  I did manage to get lost finding his house — even with a map from Mapquest and my garmin. I explained to him I never learned to ride a bike partly because my father was against it: my father worried I would get killed or in an accident as we lived in the southeast Bronx, hard city. I said Jim had gotten into a bad accident once riding on his bike to the British public school he was a day boy at, and he said he had been twice in bad accidents and once in hospital for 23 days so badly had he hurt his spine.

I realized that he has grasped how unadventurous I am — his wife was a much more daring type; she had a literary degree but she also did many athletic and other things (cooked for example), from a much more upper class background than mine — as he is. Other things about me too. As with women friends I’ve made I cannot know if this will be sustained as a friendship.

He told me of a three week tour he and she did of Italy years ago, and I told him about Jim and my time in Rome for 5 weeks with Izzy and Laura (1993 or 94) where we rented a flat, went out by ourselves for a half a day, and with these children for the other half. That we took a train to Naples and stayed in Ischia for 3 days (I was seeing where Vittoria Colonna lived as a landscape, where she grew up it’s said or visited) and how Izzy loved the beach and made friends with the Italian children with a few Italian words. I still recall her saying to them: Mi chiamo Isabella.

It was warm and sunny and I thought there is much left to live for for me and I hope I get to do it. I will keep trying to reach Kaiser and then complain. I’ve been told how people on National Health in Britain have to wait and wait and some deemed unimportant are thrown away.

Ellen

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The vignette for February in my Edward Gorey calendar

Friends,

I spent a lot of today seated reading in a comfortable chair. I was immersed in a remarkably fine Poldark novel, No 11, The Twisted Sword. Unfortunately there are no good illustrations or stills for it. I was so moved at the death of the young hero, Jeremy, at the accurate depiction (based on minute research) of the senseless horror of the battle of Waterloo, of the intense grief of Ross and Demelza, his father and mother, and h how death is deeply felt by all those he lived among. There’s also a profound depiction of the cruelty of society to disability showing how society makes the disabled far more unable, and the exposure of a  lying, murdering socially liked cad to beat all cads (a fugitive from Graham’s suspense novels) married to Clowance, our heroine .


Hougomont Farmhouse where thousands lost their lives at Waterloo: today and as imagined June 18, 1815

My cats were nearby most of the time, sleeping, resting or playing, trotting about, looking out a window. It was a bright very cold day, and will be colder yet tomorrow. A good deal of rain on and off.

From what happened today I’ve a poem to share too, by Adrienne Rich:

Storm Warnings

The glass has been falling all the afternoon,
And knowing better than the instrument
What winds are walking overhead, what zone
Of gray unrest is moving across the land,
I leave the book upon a pillowed chair
And walk from window to closed window, watching
Boughs strain against the sky.

And think again, as often when the air
Moves inward toward a silent core of waiting,
How with a single purpose time has traveled
By secret currents of the undiscerned
Into this polar realm. Weather abroad
And weather in the heart alike come on
Regardless of prediction.

Between foreseeing and averting change
Lies all the mastery of elements
Which clocks and weatherglasses cannot alter.
Time in the hand is not control of time,
Nor shattered fragments of an instrument
A roof against the wind; the wind will rise
We can only close the shutters.

I draw the curtains as the sky goes black
And set a match to candles sheathed in glass
Against the keyhole draught, the insistent whine
Of weather through the unsealed aperture.
This is our sole defense against the season;
These are the things that we have learned to do
Who live in troubled regions.

Part of the power of the poem is it’s not free verse: these are 7 line stanzas, each with a refrain of the same number of syllables. She uses syllabic verse to control the rhythms, and off-rhyme. It makes me remember the frequent Gorey illustration of someone coming to a window, looking out, and closing the curtains, turning away. This is how Ruth Prawer Jhabvala pictured her response to life ….

This evening I watched the third part of an extraordinary film adaptation for the BBC of Les Miserables, by Andrew Davies, whose lack of distribution on American TV strikes me as a deep betrayal of Davies’ humane critique of our crazed society then and now. I become breathless with stirred emotion as I watch. Davies has distilled the essential vision of Hugo — a 1000 page novel — into 6 hours: low budget sets, make-up that is a cross between Dickens and behavior out of the trauma of Marot/Sade; not heroic individualism, but society itself, the worst of human beings as at fault, reinforced by meanness, coldness of heart, a punitive persecution mentality as reigning. I thought of Hugo’s slender anti-capital punishment (the phrase seems inadequate), The last Day of a Condemned Man. Original too: the ferocity of Oyelowo seems so overwrought, and his horror at Jean Valjean’s goodness is a function (it feels like) homoerotic passion. I must write a blog-essay on this one after I’ve watched all six, comparing it to the recent 4 part Woman in White scripted by Fiona Seres. Davies’s movie does not supersede the now famous musical but might be regarded as what can frame it with understanding.


Jean Valjean (Dominic West), Fantine (Lily Collins) with Cosette, Javert (David Oyelowo)

How I get through life: When a day goes by and I realize I forgot to do this (say some specific book I was to be reading), or should have done that (blogged), or was too tired to do something else and I must to bed, and find I cannot read, I tell myself as I turn the light out, and put my small mask over my eyes, tomorrow I’ll do better, tomorrow is another day. When I wake the next morning, and feel so intensely sad, I tell myself, I’ll do what I can. This cannot be helped (the being alone), that I cannot get over (difficulties in traveling), the other thing I must accept (when I write to someone say about my project whose help I could use, or an official where I need something and no one responds — very common, gentle reader). What is the use of being angry? why blame or take it out on others? no. Try to get along, be kind, remember others suffer a lot and more than I do too. When I write postings that are misunderstood or not accepted by a majority of people, turn away from the hostile and belligerent, block insults. This doesn’t happen too often as I usually stay away from a group of people when I discover they are an unpleasant fan group but have become fascinated by Outlander and post there far too much (I must and will stop soon.) When I’ve tried to be social in non-virtual places and somehow have not managed it, when the classes I teach shrink in numbers, when I’ve decided after all not to go to this or that meeting, accept. When I see I will not able to do this paper or that review, live with it.  Do not berate self.  Remember the good blogs I’ve done, the passing pleasant conversations I have had that day at the OLLIs at Mason or AU. That we had some good conversation on my listservs and face-book pages, are reading good books, that this or that chat has been comforting.

I also go to and teach at these two OLLIs, and the winter term has started at Mason’s: two good sessions, one on American poetry, What Whitman, was at least suggestive with excerpts from a fine film Voices and visions, once shown on PBS:

Speakers include Allen Ginsburg, Justin Kaplan (Whitman’s biographer). Of course in the high school teacher running it, there was this insistence on his optimism, but part of session was devoted to Whitman’s war poetry, his homosexuality was just mentioned (it’s central), but one learned how difficult it was at first for him to gain any traction for a readership. His harsh childhood, working from a young age as a journalist, his travels all around the US, refusal to imitate older genres. I found his poetry to be more about solitude than I thought as his “I” is the only presence in the poems beyond gestures to and endless general images suffused with love for all the occupations of people.  Robinson Jeffers owes a lot to him I realized. The other on women photographers, which I have started to blog on, first up, Dorothea Lange.

I’ve had a bit of bad news: I agreed to have a general health assessment for the first time in years, including renewal of shots for things, and lo and behold was diagnosed as having the virus Hepatitis C: if you are not treated, the results can be scary. I’ve done the required “bloodwork” at a lab now, next week a scan, then see a doctor. So I’ve had to quit drinking, no more wine. Tonight was my third night: perhaps I’ll lose weight I tell myself. I feel hungrier. As someone basically toothless, I usually have sops with wine in the early evening. Now I can’t. I’ll save money. And of course perhaps my liver, if I’ve got any left. This is a big change in a long life of drinking (kept just under control). My taste buds have gotten to the point wine often doesn’t taste any good any way. Still what will I do to calm down, relax when I’ve been over-excited or come home all tense? In the later evening, alas, I’m not more wide awake and as true night comes on, I find I still can’t work or read seriously. Maybe I am more alert watching movies? I slept less the last three nights. I’m also told not to take over-the-counter sleeping pills (well I don’t, I have a prescription but …. ). However, still unsteady on my pins when I first rise from bed.

I am much relieved the senseless maniac’s partial gov’t shutdown was brought to an end, and my heroine for tonight is Nancy Pelosi:

She didn’t gloat; she remained calm, quietly reiterating all her and Chuck Schumer and the democrats’ positions. My favorite moment was when she dis-invited Trump from doing his SOTU in the Congressional assembly room and made it stick.

Ellen

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Snow-cat, made by Rob, Laura’s husband, just outside their backdoor

This morning I realized there was a sweetness about life, about existence, being alive somehow, a tone, a feel to the very air, which has vanished altogether since Jim died. My eye lighted on a house near my street, so familiar after 35 years that corner, and it came to me when I would see that corner and was driving home to where Jim often was, how the world was suffused with sweetness, a tone, a feel — gone forever, with vacuity in its place.

Friends,

The past two weeks have been cold, rain has poured on Alexandria, and now we’ve had a mild three day snow storm. Mild because only some 12 inches but enough to close down what parts of gov’t have been left open after Trump and his regime decided to make their right-wing dictatorship felt. A coup is underway to nullify the election of a democratic house. I am far from alone in being sick with worry and anxiety for my and Izzy’s comfortable existence, this house and my books supplying all that make my life worthwhile.

I’ve been thinking what can I do if Trump succeeds in keeping this up: can the money I have invested be turned around to produce some kind of income? I thought of Jane Austen’s line in Persuasion: Is there any one item on which we can retrench. I’ve been thinking of many items, including eating less and more cheaply. I’ve not bought a thing I didn’t have to since the gov’t shut down. I am already committed for two trips but after this stop. Apply for tax relief from the Alexandria property rates. I have been so proud of my garden: it would hurt not to have the gardeners work at it at least once a month (they came twice in the fall); it would break my heart, but I know nothing of gardening so need them. No more cleaning ladies. That’s easy. Izzy loves her four sports channels but we could go down on the phone somehow. Anything to stay here and keep my books. Night after night Judy Woodruff on PBS catalogues another set of individuals devastated by this.  Trump came on Fox  enjoying himself utterly. Remember he and his Republican loathe most of the agencies, like the FTC which is supposed to protect consumers, stop monopoly and exploitative practices. They are shutting all this down as a trial to see what they can destroy. They like the idea of federal workers forced to work for no pay.  Well these workers won’t keep it up for years.  My especial heart-break is the closing of the Library of Congress.


Saturday night from the windows of my enclosed porch


Sunday morning close up

I’ve been out minimally but not lonely because of the worlds of the Internet I have found so many friends and people who share some part of my taste to spend time with. I visited a friend where we had old-fashioned grilled-cheese sandwiches (on white bread no less, fried lightly in butter on a frying pan) with tea and then settled together to watch the wondrous French A Christmas Tale. She enjoyed it as deeply as I. She’s worried too: she lives on a much larger social security and annuity payments; she will rearrange her annuity payments for a start she says.

One night also I went on a date (the first in 52 years) — an old-fashioned date where the man picked me up by car, drove me to an elegant yet home-y Irish pub in Northwest Washington where we had a yummy meal and good talk; afterwards a drive through very pretty park-lined and riverside streets, and then home again home again, jiggedy-jig, where he walked me to my door. I even dressed up, complete high heels and an attempt at make-up (feeble, basically lip-stick).

I know my face looks awful but consider that the cell phone picked up harsh shadows in Izzy’s half-lit room.

We were in a neighborhood in Northwest Washington I knew existed, sort of, but had never been in. The OLLI at AU is there. Very wealthy, exclusive (he pointed to three clubs he belongs to along the river, one where no one else can come into that piece of land in that park), beautiful, forest-y. There’s a Great Falls I’d never heard of and he was even startled to hear I’d never heard of it. His big income comes from years of working in high positions in agencies Trump will destroy: environmental; he did “operations research” (mathematical finding of which is your best option to do; this is used to bomb things). He is by older heritage Jewish, but his family spent so many years in Arkansas and then Tennessee so he has no memories of any heritage but American — one of his clubs meets in a local very tasteful Episcopalian church.  An intelligent sports person, someone who knew how to and still does socialize and network, a widower, with 2 (!) guns in his house. I could see he was rightist — trained to be a fighter pilot in the later 1950s. He knew what an adjunct is, and said of Jim’s career, what a shame he didn’t make more money with such degrees. I think for us, given my expectations, & where we both came from, Jim did very well. I know mainstream people will comment (adversely) he retired so early. Yes, and I have much less because of this, but he lived for 9 years he would not have had he worked until 65, gotten that dreadful cancer, and been devoured.  So not a lot of common ground. The evening was though very pleasant. Both people kept up cordial conversation.  I think I’d actually never been on a date like this before — never treated that way in my teens. Perhaps it fit Christine Blasey Forde’s expectations when she found herself among thug upper class males for the first time. The evening was a sociological lesson for me.

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The facsimile edition


the beloved and loving dog, Hajjin

I read a new remarkable short novel where the central consciousness is a nearly kidnapped dog, the 19th century novella, The Confessions of a Lost Dog by Francis Power Cobbe — she anticipates Woolf’s Flush: deeply humane and somewhat convincing attempt to get inside a dog’s personality, not the physical self the way Woolf tried. She is one of the women I am hopeful about writing about for my projected part of a book, working title, The Anomaly (only single women trying to live apart from men have not been.) I  am now reading Elena Ferrante’s My Brilliant Friend as translated by Ann Goldstein: she describes a world I grew up in (Naples = southeast Bronx, circa 1950s). Lenu the reader, and Lila who learns to cast off ambition because thwarted hope is one of the most painful of experiences..

Still inching along in the helpful Cornwall: The Cultural Construction of Place, ed Ella Westland, have opened and begun more of my Cornwall travel-memoir meditative history-as-reverie books. I’m now reading the three Poldark novels I’ve chosen for the paper I’m supposed to give in Denver (if airplanes are flying — I don’t know why the TSA people just don’t go on strike — all terrorized they will lose their jobs; this is what employment in the US has come to). And I’ve had one of those delightful literary discoveries fit only for cherished re-telling in a diary.

All the years of watching the two different Poldark, and having read the twelve books I thought carefully through, I never realized both series had omitted Aunt Agatha, the 98 year old unmarried Poldark aunt’s kitten. In scenes where she appears in Black Moon we are told she has a kitten and then cat keeping her affectionate company. His name is Smollett and I suspect the name is reference to the popular 18th century novelist, Smollett who features an old unmarried woman and her beloved dog in an epistolary novel, Humphry Clinker (the hero is Methodist), and cats and offensive smells in a travel -tour book.


Agatha (Caroline Blakiston) saying goodbye to Verity (from Season 3, Black Moon)

When we first see Agatha, we are told

A black kitten moved on her lap. This was Smollett, which she had found somewhere a few months ago and made peculiarly her own. Now they were inseparable. Agatha never stirred without the kitten, and Smollett, all red tongue and yellow eye, could hardly be persuaded to leave her. Geoffrey Charles, with a small boy’s glee, always called her ‘Smell-it.’ [When George Warleggan intrudes.] The kitten, to Agatha’s pleasure, had arched its back and spat at the new arrival (Black Moon, Chapter 1).

Smollett is mentioned in passing, and when on the last page of this novel, Agatha lies dying:

The bed shook as Smollett jumped on it again. Her head was sinking sideways on the pillow. With great effort, she straightened it … then the light began to go, the warm, milk yellow sunlight of a summer day … She could not close her mouth. She tried to close her mouth and failed. Her tongue stopped. But one hand slowly moved. Smollett nudged up to it and licked it with his rough tongue. The sensation of that roughness made its way from her fingers to her brain. It was the last feeling left. The fingers moved a moment on the cat’s fur. Hold me, hold me, they said. Then quietly peacefully, at the last, submissively, beaten by a stronger will than her own, her eyes opened and she left the world behind (Black Moon, last chapter, last page, last paragraph)

Graham is very fond of animals, and especially a lover of cats throughout his novels. Ross Poldark meets Demelza because at the risk of her own severe body injury she was defending her dog, Garrick, from torturous abuse for the amusement of a mob and several boys. Here are Ian and Clarycat near a snow filled window with their toy mouse:

For snow days: I recommend the remarkable movie about Gertrude Bell narrated by Tilda Swinden, for its remarkably contemporary film footage, Bell’s letters, virtuoso performances of BBC actors as Bell’s family, friends, associates: Letters from Baghdad. I’m listening to Timothy West’s inimitable reading of Trollope’s The Way We Live Now, as prelude to Can You Forgive Her? and for a group discussion (Trollope&Peers); this is alternatively with Davina Porter reading Gabaldon’s Drums of Autumn. I shall buy no more of these but listen and re-listen to what I have. My kind Irish friend has sent me so many copies of DVDs of very good British BBC movies, I can go for years. My movies at home and nightly for now are both sets of Poldark serial dramas (back-to-back watching of equivalent episodes), Outlander Seasons 2 and 4. I was disappointed but not surprised when Caitriona Balfe, nominated for Golden Globe as best actress for four years in row, lost once again. Always the bridesmaid, never the bride ….

It is hard to find Balfe in a dress I can endure to look at at these ceremonies: a salutary reminder of the real woman (the first phase of her career was as a fashion model).. She is presented in the features as a cooperative team player . The blog where I found the image, repeatedly said of the dress it’s too “LV” — perhaps Louis Vuitton, but a sneering tone accompanied by scorn for those “who have trouble paying their rent,” so it’s probably a withering resentment of her outfit as not overtly extravagant, ritzy, expensive enough. I remember Jenny Bevan who has dressed hundreds of actors and actresses in the best movies for years, turning up for her award for costume in ordinary pants, top, her hair simply brushed was booed. So you see where the outrageous lengths this red carpet stupidity goes to comes from: the worst values of mean minds.

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As for keeping body as well as soul up, I walk for 20 minutes in the afternoons, and listen to country and folk music in the mornings as I exercise for 10 minutes and close this evening with Pete Seeger’s “There’s a river of my people:

There’s a river of my people
And its flow is swift and strong,
Flowing to some mighty ocean,
Though its course is deep and long.
Flowing to some mighty ocean,
Though its course is deep and long.

Many rocks and reefs and mountains
Seek to bar it from its way.
But relentlessly this river
Seeks its brothers in the sea.
But relentlessly this river
Seeks its brothers in the sea.

You will find us in the mainstream,
Steering surely through the foam,
Far beyond the raging waters
We can see our certain home.
Far beyond the raging waters
We can see our certain home.

For we have mapped this river
And we know its mighty force
And the courage that this gives us
Will hold us to our course.
And the courage that this gives us
Will hold us to our course.

Oh, river of my people,
Together we must go,
Hasten onward to that meeting
Where my brothers wait I know.
Hasten onward to that meeting
Where my sisters wait I know.

Songwriters: Peter Seeger

Miss Drake

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